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Programmatic Key Bindings

by VonHeikemen ST3

Declare your keybinding in sublime text using Python

Labels keymap

Details

Installs

  • Total 26
  • Win 20
  • Mac 3
  • Linux 3
Aug 3 Aug 2 Aug 1 Jul 31 Jul 30 Jul 29 Jul 28 Jul 27 Jul 26 Jul 25 Jul 24 Jul 23 Jul 22 Jul 21 Jul 20 Jul 19 Jul 18 Jul 17 Jul 16 Jul 15 Jul 14 Jul 13 Jul 12 Jul 11 Jul 10 Jul 9 Jul 8 Jul 7 Jul 6 Jul 5 Jul 4 Jul 3 Jul 2 Jul 1 Jun 30 Jun 29 Jun 28 Jun 27 Jun 26 Jun 25 Jun 24 Jun 23 Jun 22 Jun 21 Jun 20
Windows 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mac 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Linux 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Readme

Source
raw.​githubusercontent.​com

Sublime Text Programmatic Key Bindings

Use the full power of python to declare your key bindings.

Just imaging writing your bindings with this api:

prefix_origami = "ctrl+w"

def keybinding(bind, **kwargs):
  command = kwargs.get('command')

  # Move between selections in overlay
  bind(["alt+k"], "move", overlay_visible, by="lines", forward=False)
  bind(["alt+j"], "move", overlay_visible, by="lines", forward=True)

  # Safe quit
  bind(["ctrl+q"], [command("close_workspace"), command("exit")])

  # Plugin: Origami
  bind([prefix_origami], "noop") # Disable the default behavior of ctrl+w
  bind([prefix_origami, "q"], "close")
  bind([prefix_origami, "c"], "destroy_pane", direction="self")



# Contexts
overlay_visible = {
  "key": "overlay_visible",
  "operator": "equal",
  "operand": True
}

Getting Started

Installation

Recommended

Install Programmatic Key Bindings via Package Control.

  1. Open the Command Palette via Ctrl/+Shift+p
  2. Then select Package Control: Install Package
  3. Search for Programmatic Key Bindings and press ↲ Enter

Manual

  1. Clone or download this repository, (re)name the folder to Programmatic Key Bindings if necessary.
  2. Move the folder inside your sublime /Packages. (Preferences > Browse Packages…)

Usage

Using the default command

This plugin only adds one command to sublime text:

[
  {
    "caption": "Sublime Programmatic Key Bindings - Compile Default",
    "command": "spk_key_binding",
    "args": {
      "bindings": "$packages/User/Programmatic Key Bindings/keybindings.py",
      "destination": "$packages/User/Programmatic Key Bindings/Default ($platform).sublime-keymap"
    }
  }
]

Make sure the file that bindings is pointing to exists and also that the destination can be created in the directory. In here $packages refers to the directory where your sublime text packages live.

Once you have created the file create a function called keybinding. This function will be called with two arguments. The first argument is the function gathers the data of your keybindings. The second is a helper function which should be used only when you need to bind multiple commands to a key.

def keybinding(bind, **kwargs):
  command = kwargs.get('command')

  # Your code...

After this function is executed a .sublime-keymap will be created in the directory Programmatic Key Bindings located in your “user folder”. Sublime text will pick up any changes to that file and will reload your key bindings so the changes take effect (and you should be able to use then inmediately, reset sublime if you want to be sure).

That means, this plugin doesn't do anything at runtime. After the .sublime-keymap is created everything is in the hands of sublime's internal mechanism.

Anyway, once your ready, search the command Sublime Programmatic Key Bindings - Compile Default in the command palette and run it.

Create your own command

If you want to manage your primary keymap, the one in the root of your user folder, you need to create a new command.

First, create a file called Default.sublime-commands (in your user folder). In there you can your custom command.

[
  {
    "caption": "Update root key bindings",
    "command": "spk_key_binding",
    "args": {
      "bindings": "$packages/User/keybindings.py",
      "destination": "$packages/User/Default.sublime-keymap"
    }
  }
]

Now your ready. Make sure keybindings.py exists and has the code you need. Search in the command palette Update root key bindings, run it and enjoy.

User binding API

A.K.A keybindings.py, the only thing you need there is the keybinding function.

Function bind

bind(<keys>, <command>, ...[context], **kwargs)

The first argument is an array of keys you want to bind.

The second argument is the command you want to run. This could be a string or an array of commands. This plugin allows you to bind a sequence of commands if you pass an array, but since this isn't a built-in feature of sublime you need to use the helper function provided in kwargs, which is called command.

command(<name>, **kwargs)

command takes the name of the command as the first argument, and rest of the keyword arguments will be the arguments to the command you want to run.

Going back to bind. The first and second arguments are required, the rest of the positional arguments can be “context objects”.

If your command is not a sequence, the keyword arguments of bind will become the arguments to the command you want to run.

Support

If you find this plugin useful and want to support my efforts, buy me a coffee ☕.

buy me a coffee