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Alabaster Color Scheme

by tonsky ST3

A light color scheme with minimal amount of highlighting for Sublime Text 3

Labels color scheme

Details

Installs

  • Total 1K
  • Win 539
  • OS X 302
  • Linux 192
Aug 20 Aug 19 Aug 18 Aug 17 Aug 16 Aug 15 Aug 14 Aug 13 Aug 12 Aug 11 Aug 10 Aug 9 Aug 8 Aug 7 Aug 6 Aug 5 Aug 4 Aug 3 Aug 2 Aug 1 Jul 31 Jul 30 Jul 29 Jul 28 Jul 27 Jul 26 Jul 25 Jul 24 Jul 23 Jul 22 Jul 21 Jul 20 Jul 19 Jul 18 Jul 17 Jul 16 Jul 15 Jul 14 Jul 13 Jul 12 Jul 11 Jul 10 Jul 9 Jul 8 Jul 7 Jul 6
Windows 1 0 2 1 2 0 4 0 3 1 4 3 2 5 2 2 1 1 3 5 6 3 1 3 1 1 1 4 5 2 1 3 2 1 2 2 2 3 0 1 1 0 5 3 4 3
OS X 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 3 1 1 0 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Linux 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 4 1 1 3 0 3 1 2 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1

Readme

Source
raw.​githubusercontent.​com

Alabaster Color Scheme

A light color scheme with minimal amount of highlighting for Sublime Text 3.

Motivation

Most color schemes highlight everything they can, ending up looking like a fireworks show.

Instead, Alabaster uses minimal highlighting; it defines just four classes:

  1. Strings
  2. All statically known constants (numbers, symbols, keywords, boolean values)
  3. Comments
  4. Global definitions

Additionally:

  • Alabaster does not highlight standard language keywords (if, else, function, etc). They are usually least important and most obvious part of any program.

  • Alabaster highlights comments. Most schemes try to dim comments by using low-contrast greys. I think if code was complex enough that it deserved an explanation then it’s that explanation we should see and read first. It would be a crime to hide it.

  • Alabaster doesn’t use font variations. It’s hard to scan code when it jumps between normal, bold and italics all the time. Also, not all fonts provide bold/italics variants.

  • Having minimal amount of rules means you can consciously use them to look for the exact piece of information you need. Most other “fireworks” schemes provide only one meaningful contribution: if it’s colored it’s probably syntactically correct. Instead, in Alabaster you can actually remember all the rules, and e.g. if you need to look for a string you know that you’re looking for a green token. And all the strings really pop out because there are not many other things highlighted.

  • Alabaster only highlights things that parser could identify reliably. I believe that if highlighting works only partially then it does more harm than good. When highlighting works reliably, your brain learns to rely on it. When it’s not reliable, your brain spends precious brain cycles to re-check everything it sees on the screen.

Screenshots

Screenshot

Alabaster BG

Alabaster BG is a variation of the same scheme but it uses background color for highlighting instead of text color. The idea is that it is easier to read when all text is black rather than when it changes color every few words. The colored background in that case creates a separate layer which is easier to ignore if you just trying to read the words.

Screenshot

Installation

Both schemes are packed in the same package.

Via Package Control

  1. ToolsCommand Palette...Package Control: Install PackageAlabaster Color Scheme.
  2. Select Preferences → Color Scheme ... and pick Alabaster or Alabaster BG from the menu.

Manual Installation

  1. Download *.sublime-color-scheme files from this repo.
  2. Select Preferences → Browse packages from the main menu.
  3. Copy *.sublime-color-scheme files to Packages/User/.
  4. Select Preferences → Color Scheme ... and pick Alabaster or Alabaster BG from the menu.

License

MIT License

Variations