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Summit​Editor

by corvisa ST3

SummitEditor - The official SublimeText 3 plugin for http://corvisa.com

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  • Total 1K
  • Win 588
  • OS X 487
  • Linux 258
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Windows 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 2 0 3 0 1 0 0 1
OS X 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Linux 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0

Readme

Source
raw.​githubusercontent.​com

SummitEditor

SummitEditor is the official Sublime Text 3 plugin for Corvisa LLC's Summit platform. It provides you with useful snippets, syntax highlighting, and most importantly, access to the Summit Simulator.

Installation

Requirements

All platforms require git, bash, and ssh to be installed and on the system path. There are additional requirements for windows and linux listed below.

Windows * Git must be installed to the default location, this will be made more configurable in future updates. * The git/bin directory must be on the system path. * If not on the path already, git, bash, and ssh can be put on the path by selecting the “Use Git and optional Unix tools from the Windows Command Prompt” option on the “Adjusting your PATH environment” step of the git installer.

Linux * Xterm must be installed and on the system path. This should be more flexible in future updates.

Package installation

The recommended way to install SummitEditor is through Package Control. If you do not have Package Control installed, read the installation instructions. To install via Package Control:

  1. Bring up the Command Palette (ctrl+shift+p or cmd+shift+p on Mac) and type install. Among the commands you should see Package Control: Install Package. If that command is not highlighted, use the keyboard or mouse to select it. There will be a pause of a few seconds while Package Control fetches the list of available plugins.
  2. When the plugin list appears, type SummitEditor. Among the entries you should see SummitEditor. If that entry is not highlighted, use the keyboard or mouse to select it.

Optionally, you can use git to clone this repository into your Sublime Text Packages directory. You can confirm that installation has worked by opening the Command Palette and typing the word summit. You should see an available syntax option for Lua (Summit).

Optional Packages

SummitEditor also offers a SummitLinter plugin for SublimeLinter 3 allowing for automatic linting of your code. To install SummitLinter (as well as SublimeLinter if it is not already installed), first make sure you meet the requirements, then select Tools > SummitEditor > Install SummitLinter Packages. Note: using this option requires Package Control to be installed.

Application Structure

When you clone your application, the application directory should be as follows:

<application>
├── assets/
├── spec/
├── src/
└── REPOCONF

The simulator will run the main.lua file inside the application's src directory.

Running The Simulator

Once the package has been installed there are a handful of configuration changes to be made in order to start simulating your code. All simulations require that your code be in a SublimeText project. This can be done easily by cloning your code into a directory, then using File -> Open Folder to open the files. Once this has been done you can create a project from this open set of files by going to Project -> Save Project As....

Now that you have a project created, we need to add some simulator settings to it. Simply go to Project -> Edit Project and add the following:

"build_path": "/folder/that/contains/your/application/source"

build_path should point to the src directory's parent directory and not the src directory itself. There are also a few other optional parameters, which will allow you to connect to your live datastore from the simulator. You need to include all of the following: “json "application_id”: “12345678-1234-5678-1234-567812345678”, “api_key”: “bl53y1g3l5AS”, “api_secret”: “bkas34n23=2”, “use_live_datastore”: “true”

You can generate an API Key and Secret in your Summit Account under `Access -> API Keys`. Your Application ID is available in the Applications grid. Hover over a column header and click the arrow that appears. You will see a menu with additional columns, including "Application ID". Alternatively, your Application ID is available as the UUID at the end of your git remote.

Your final Project settings file should look something like this (if your app was in `/home/myuser/code/DemoApp/`:
```json
{
    "folders":
    [
        {
            "follow_symlinks": true,
            "path": "/home/myuser/code/DemoApp"
        }
    ],
    "build_path": "/home/myuser/code/DemoApp",
    "application_id": "12345678-1234-5678-1234-567812345678",
    "api_key": "bl53y1g3l5AS",
    "api_secret": "bkas34n23=2",
    "use_live_datastore": "true"
}

With these settings configured, you can start the simulation in one of two ways. First you must have the syntax settings of your file set to Lua (Summit) or you can manually select your build script from Tools -> Build System. If you need to do a simple simulation (one that does not require any special flags), you can now simply press ctrl+b on Windows or Linux machines and cmd-b on Mac computers. This should cause a terminal window to open on your screen allowing you to interact with your simulated application.

If your application requires additional flags to be set before being run you can start your build with ctrl+shift+b on Windows and Linux or cmd+shift+b on Mac computers. This will open an options panel on the bottom of the screen. This options panel accepts arguments prefixed with dashes and separated by spaces, ex - --DNIS 5558675309 --ANI 5554441212. A complete list of options is as follows:

Option Detail Example
DNIS Sets the DNIS or “number dialed”, useful for testing number based routing. --DNIS 15558675309
ANI Sets the ANI or “number app called from”, useful for doing things like looking up existing customers by phone number. --ANI 15551234567
test Runs your unit tests, instead of opening the simulator. --test
verbose Should only be used in conjunction with test; This will output the full coverage report for your application (line by line), allowing you to see where you are missing test coverage. --test --verbose

License

The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright © 2014 Corvisa LLC

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the “Software”), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS IS”, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.